The best esports teams in The World

If you are asked to name the best esports teams in the world right now, what metric would you use? Would you go by the teams playing your favourite games? Or would you look at the highest earners? Maybe even the best combination of your mates. Awards won? Others would go for consistency in recent global competitions.

Well, there is no right or wrong metric. However, in the modern world of sport, data is key. Today, we look at the best esports teams in the world based on what they have in the bag. These are the Barcelonas, Madrids, Arsenals and Manchesters of the e-sports world.

Best Esports Teams by Earnings

The esports competition purse has been growing exponentially over the last few years. Therefore, a team may have won many tournaments a few years ago and get eclipsed by a team that wins a giant purse in the very recent past. That said, here are the top earners in the industry.

5. Virtus.pro (VP)

This Russian team has an eciting history that can form an article of its own (remind me to write about that sometime). Since its formation in 2003, it has had its fair share of ups and downs. These include dropping entire teams for poor performances and getting epelled from competitions for breaking the rules.

However, te team has also had good runs in several competitions. They are masters at Dota, Fortnite and CS:GO. Between 2015 and 2020, the team was able to rake in €11920344 ($14,403,074). This mostly came from the three disciplines. Dota brought in €7988152 ($9,651,899), CS:GO fetched €2595589 ($3,136,190) and Fortnite topped that up with €258435 ($312,261). The team proudly displays these successes on their website. They have won top honours in competitions like The Bucharest Major, The ESL One, Flashpoint and ELEAGUE.

Total eSports team Earnings: €11,920,344 ($14,403,074)

Bringing Sexy Back: The best esports teams
Bringing Sexy Back: The best esports teams make the discipline attractive as a career | image: Francesco De Tommaso/Unsplash

4. Fnatic esports Team

Fnatic is a UK-based team that majors in Dota 2, League of Legends (LoL) and CS:GO. It has both men and women teams. Despite being UK-based, the team has often fielded teams dominated by Swedes. Fnatic carved its place among bigwigs by becoming the first outfit to grab three CS:GO Majors. They won the first-ever DreamHack Major in 2013. They then went on to complete a hattrick with the ESL One Katowice and Cologne editions in 2015.

The team has earned €3,373,373 ($4,075,969) from Dota2, €3,659,953 ($4,422,237) from CS:GO, and €2,377,207 ($2,872,325) from LoL. For an outfit that has been existent since 2004, the last five years form its most successful era. They keep growing and are eager to get back to action in 2021. you can check them out on their website.

Total eSports Teams Earnings: €13,017,901 ($15,729,227)

3. Evil Geniuses (EG)

EG is a North Amrican team that was founded in 1999. Like everything American, strategy and timing are key among their attributes. For instance, in 2011, they went in with a new Dota2 team. The team’s first assignment was a boot camp to China. The assignment? To learn how they would participate in competitions within the region. The result? A quarter-final finish at the World DotA Championship 2nd edition and a slot at the SMM 2011. A nice pay-off, isn’t it?

Although EG plays a variety of games, Dota 2 has brought in more that 80% of their winnings. This is both due to the generous Dota 2 purse and theteam’s prowess in the game. EG is a big name at The International. They also perform well when it is time for the Call of Duty.

Total eSports Teams Earnings: €20,081,243 ($24,263,698).

2. OG

OG is one of the small boys that have risen to shake up the list of the best esports teams in the world. Powered by RedBull- literally, it seems- the team has racked up major wins and major money. They came to the forefront at the Frankfurt major in 2015. As underdgs, they beat the likes of Evol Geniuses and CDEC Gaming. A win in the Kiev Major (2017) earned them an honour of first team to sweep four Dota Major Championships. No wonder they love playing Dota!

In total, OG has been able to amass €28,092,268 ($33,943,233) in winnings. What is even more interesting? €27,856,232 ($33,658,036) of this came in one competition! They also have the 208 and 2019 Dota2: The international titles n their bag. How did they manage all this, you ask? The answer: because the team’s founder is the real OG- Johan Sunstein (27), arguably the most successful professional in the world of esports- ever!

Total eSports Teams Earnings: €28,092,268 ($33,943,233)

1. Team Liquid

On top of the world, literally, is the indisputable Team liquid. With 20 years in the game, the Dutch team has traversed the esports world far and wide to get where it is today. it is another team that requires a stand-alone article of its own. But, for now, the money.

They have won an exemplary 1837 tournaments in total. They play mainly in StarCraft and Dota 2. Their most iconic tournament has to be the 2017 edition of Dota2: The International. With a huge wave in their wake, the team came into the tournament as favourites. They performed well in the opening stages, unsurprisingly. However, as the stages progressed, Team Liquid found themselves losing to unexpected opponents and falling to lower levers. Still, they were able to overturn things and emerge winners at the end, downing Newbee (again). This was their first Dota Major Championship, and boy was it glorious. Over €8.28 million ($10 million) prize money was well worth the effort! But did they take bettors on a roller coaster ride or what!

Team Liquid has won €18,966,211 ($22,916,431) from Dota alone. CS:GO brings €3,857,911 ($4,661,425) to the bag and Fortnite brings €1,052,628 ($1,271,866). League of Legends contributes €707588 ($854,963). What a brilliant spell Team Liquid has had. And entertaining us all along the way. On to greater things in 2021.

Total eSports Teams Money Earned: €29,537,893 ($35,689,948)

Clocking out…

Nothing much to say on the clock-out, really. I’ll just keep quiet and let the figures sink in. Then leave you to ask (yourself) the questions. Can I get in on this? What would I do with a fraction of these winnings? Don’t I play video games every day? Well, you have the answers, and you can always check in here for more. It’s big enough here, so feel free to tag your mates. Any questions you cannot find answers to? Anything you would like to add? A specific topic you would like us to discuss? Tell us in the comment section below. (Yes, we hate the email request too, but it’s only a one-time thing).

See you on the other end!

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